Friday, 5 December 2003

Google files DJ action against American Blind

I love it when companies are willing to spend money to clarify the law in areas where it is murky. Playboy used to be great in this area, filing many suits that pushed copyright and trademark law into the digital age at a time when the Internet had barely entered the popular lexicon. Many of those cases went all the way to judgment and appeal — which gave something back to the public, in exchange for the judicial resources that Playboy consumed.

Now Google has started. Last week the search company filed a declaratory judgment action against American Blind & Wallpaper Factory, asking the U.S. District Court in San Josť to clarify its rights. American Blind (among many others) has complained recently to Google about Google's sale of keywords to its advertisers. Google has been fairly responsive about such trademark requests, but AB and others frequently claim to have rights in words and phrases that do not precisely match their registered or common law trademarks. They do have some trademark-like rights in such terms, but it is often difficult to discern exactly what they are. This case should help.

Thanks go to GrepLaw for the heads up.

Posted at 5:35:35 PM | Permalink

Trackback URL: http://www.danfingerman.com/cgi-bin/mt-tb.cgi/95
Topics: Civil Liberties, Cyberlaw, IP, Technology
Email this entry to:


Your email address:


Message (optional):




Powered by Movable Type