Tuesday, 16 December 2003

CRIA Follows Big Brother's Lead

Both Big Brothers, actually. The National Post reports ("Music sharers to face lawsuits"):

The millions of Canadians who share music files on the Internet should be prepared for the possibility of facing a lawsuit early in the new year, the head of the Canadian Recording Industry Association said yesterday. … [Brian] Robertson would not specify how many lawsuits would be filed, but he did say the legal action would be similar to the lawsuits filed in the United States. For some time, CRIA has been using software that tracks and identifies users involved in trading free music files. "Users should be aware that using file-sharing services is a very public process," Mr. Robertson said.
Since Canada has no analog to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA), it will be interesting to see whether CRIA's tracking software is anywhere near as effective as RIAA's subpoenas. Neither one, it cannot be pointed out often enough, has any judicial oversight. And both are ripe for abuse.

Posted at 10:33:38 AM | Permalink

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Topics: Civil Liberties, Cyberlaw, DMCA, IP, P2P, Privacy
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