Friday, 19 December 2003

Dutch high court: Kazaa not liable

The Dutch supreme court has ruled that the makers of Kazaa are not liable for illegal use of the software by users. Reuters UK reports ("Dutch Court Throws Out Attempt to Control Kazaa"):

The decision by the Dutch court, the highest European body yet to rule on file-sharing software, means that the developers of the software cannot be held liable for how individuals use it. It does not address issues over individuals' use of such networks. […] The Supreme Court rejected demands by Buma Stemra, the Dutch royalties collection society, that distribution of Kazaa cease and that future versions be modified so that copyrighted materials cannot be exchanged over the network, lawyers representing Kazaa said.
It looks like Matt Oppenheim, a senior vice president of RIAA, has to eat his words from March 2002. Describing the Dutch appeals court action underlying yesterday's supreme court decision, he said: "I don't think this summary decision…will have any more impact than it would have from any other country that doesn't enforce copyright law consistent with the United States." Matt, perhaps you can tell me if I spelled "jingo" correctly.

Posted at 10:53:25 AM | Permalink

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Topics: Cybercrime, Cyberlaw, IP, P2P
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