Wednesday, 24 December 2003

Commence lobbying

Evan Hansen writes on C|Net: "Will DVD acquittal mean tougher copyright laws?" His answer is yes.

Even before [Norway's prosecution of DVD-Jon] was filed, however, entertainment industry lobbyists had been pressing lawmakers in that country and elsewhere to enact tougher copyright laws, modeled on controversial U.S. legislation that makes it easier for authorities to win prison terms for people who crack encryption schemes or distribute cracking tools. If enacted, proposed legislation in Europe, Canada, Australia and Central and South America would soon hand entertainment companies similar weapons against people caught tinkering with anticopying software.
[…]
In some ways, the Johansen ruling offers a simple reminder that different countries have different laws, and companies can't rely on protections established in one region to protect them elsewhere. But the case also points to an aggressive drive in the entertainment industry to win greater global conformity in copyright law, modeled on the DMCA.
[…]
As Norway illustrates, however, the process can move slowly, leaving the entertainment industry exposed to weaker copyright rules in regions where DMCA-like laws have not yet been passed.
Via Furdlog.

Posted at 6:47:08 PM | Permalink
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Topics: Cyberlaw, DMCA, IP, Politics
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