Thursday, 29 July 2004

Analyzing popularity of online resources

TRN reports an interesting new method for analyzing popularity of online resources ("Online popularity tracked"). In a nutshell, a group of researchers from Cornell University and the Internet Archive have developed a method for determining the "batting average" of a given resource.

The item description batting average is different from just tracking the output of a hit counter, which measures the raw number of item visits or downloads, said Jon Kleinberg, an associate professor of computer science at Cornell University. "The batting average addresses the more subtle notion of users' reactions to the item description as it appears in the fraction of users who go on to download the item."

[...]
The researchers found that on the Web, popularity often changes abruptly rather than gradually. "For example, an item would be getting downloaded at a rate of roughly 38 percent, and then at exactly 8: 35 a.m. on February 20, it would drop to about 24 percent and stay there for the next several days," said Kleinberg.

Posted at 9:34:36 PM | Permalink
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